Mahnaz Yousefzadeh

Yousefzadeh

Clinical Professor of Liberal Studies

Ph.D., State University of New York in Binghamton- Modern European History

Areas of Interest: Aesthetic and Political Theory; Ontology of the Contemporary; Mediterranean History, Global Education, Italian Nationalism

Course(s) Taught: Social Foundations I, II & III; Cultural Foundations I, II & III, Middle Eastern Cultures; Junior Independent Research Seminar; The Mediterranean, a Post-Colonial Sea; Aesthetics and Politics of the Modern; On Collective Memory: Ethics and Politics of the Past

Fellowships/Honors:

    NYU Global Research Institute London, Spring 2015
    NEH Summer Fellowship, American Academy in Rome, Summer 2007
    NYU Challenge Grant, Summer 2010

Teaching Statement:

"Every relation of hegemony is necessarily an educational relationship." --Antonio Gramsci

“Is a philosophical movement properly so called when it is devoted to creating a specialized culture among restricted intellectual groups, or rather, when, and only when, in this process of elaborating a form of thought superior to ‘common sense’ and coherent on a specific scientific plane, it never forgets to remain in contact with ‘simple’ and indeed finds in this contact the source of problems it sets out to study and to resolve…” – Antonio Gramsci

As a teacher, I endeavor to inspire students to become intellectually curious agents of culture and society. The pedagogical task for me is to model the intellectual thrill of textual discovery in class, then take students outside the classroom for real-life contact with the origins and legacies of the texts. I have deep respect for students and their potential as critical and creative thinkers and writers. I see it as my task to help them develop their potential through feedback, feedback that highlights their current strengths and pushes the arguments and analysis to a certain limit. My goal is not only to bring the texts to life, but to take students “behind the scenes” of culture creation in order to experience themselves as active participants rather than as mere consumers of knowledge.

Publications:

Books:
  • City and Nation in Italian Unification: National Festivals of Dante. Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
  • Florence’s Maiden Mediterranean Voyage: Felice Brancacci’s Visit to the Sultan, the Ordeal of the Florin, and the Healing Power of Masaccio’s Tribute Money, Olschki, (Forthcoming)
  • “Anti-Hegemonic Nationalism: The 1865 Centenary Festa of Dante,” in Peter Arnade and Michael Rocke, eds., Private Conduct, Gender, and Public Life in Early Modern  Europe and Mesoamerica: Essays in Honor of Richard C. Trexler, Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Research, Essays and Studies, University of Toronto, 2008

Articles:


  • “Canonicity and Popularity in the Nineteenth Century: Dante, Schiller and Shakespeare Festivals,” in Joep Leerssen and Anne Rigney eds.,  The Centenary Effect: Commemorating Writers in Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century (Forthcoming 2013, Palgrave Macmillan)
  • “Anti-Hegemonic Nationalism: The 1865 Centenary Festa of Dante,” in Peter Arnade and Michael Rocke, eds., Private Conduct, Gender, and Public Life in Early Modern  Europe and Mesoamerica: Essays in Honor of Richard C. Trexler, Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Research, Essays and Studies, University of Toronto, 2008.
  • “What is Iranian Jewish?” Shofar vol. 6, no. 2  (1995)


Conferences and Presentations:
  • Keynote speaker,  “Dante and Milton: Visionary Nationalist.” Conference November 2013, University of London.
  • “Shah Abbas at the Court of the Medicis” invited presentation at Circolo Italiano, London, October 4, 2013. Invited Speaker, University Research Seminar, University College London, March 2013.
  • Invited Speaker, The Warburg Institute, Art History Seminars, February 2013.
  •  “Globalizing the Humanities,” contribution to the LS panel "Realizing Global Education: Texts, Contexts, Curriculum, and Technology." World Education Forum, Rome, January 2011
  •  “Mediterranean Journeys: Felice Brancacci, Pietro Della Valle and Ippolito Rosellini.”  Presented at ACLA, New Orleans, April 2010. 
  • “Flood of Words: Counting and Un-counting the 1865 Dante Centenary Archives.”  Presented at “Risorgimento Revisited,” at the Italian Academy of Columbia University, New York, April 2008.
  • “Aesthetics and Politics of Immigration: San Lorenzo in Florence.” Paper presented at EACLALS triennial conference, Venice,  March 2008.
  • “Foucault and the Iranian Revolution.” Paper presented at Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, April 2006.
  • “Civility and Natural Law: Hobbes’s Leviathan as an Education Treatise for the Sovereign and the Subject.” Invited contribution to Duke University’s Center for European Studies Conference, Trieste, Italy, April 2005.
  • “Anti-Hegemonic Nationalism: The 1865 Centenary Festa of Dante.” Presented at symposium “Public Life and Private Conduct: Changing Historical Perspectives Across the Early Modern World," SUNY Binghamton, April 7-8, 2004.
  •  “Response to Sidney Tarrow’s The New Transnational Contention.”  Paper presented at NYU Center For European Studies sponsored workshop, “Understanding 21st Century,” April 2004.
  • “The Long Duree of European Formation: Nomos and Katechon.” Invited contribution to Duke University sponsored conference, Sovereignty and Subjectivity, Spain, March 2004
  • “To Rethink the Humanities.” Paper presented at a colloquium of the same title at Binghamton University, April 2003

Online:
 



Updated on 11/08/2016